Knowledgeable Panda

Ask me   Submit   A quirky biomedical engineer blogging about life and research. Biology: Developmental, Physiology, and diseases; Biomedical Engineering: Tissue Engineering; Basic science; and of course rants of daily life and what I find interesting and inspirational.

“Not long ago, the story was simple. A vanguard of modern humans left their African birthplace 50,000–60,000 years ago and quickly conquered Asia. They turned left into Europe some 40,000 years ago, later crossing the Bering Strait and marching southward into the Americas. With their advance, Neanderthals and other earlier peoples dwindled and vanished.” …
“The most dramatic change, however, concerns the archaic peoples whose world we inherited. In the past two years, ancient-DNA researchers have deciphered the full genome sequences of Neanderthals and a hitherto unknown group called Denisovans, then compared them with modern human genomes. The startling upshot: genetic traces of our vanished cousins live on in people today (see page 33). Just where and how the ancient trysts took place is yet to be revealed, as researchers continue to unravel the human story.”


From nature.com

Step by step around the globe
02 May 2012


Human migrations: Eastern odyssey
02 May 2012


Evolution: What makes a modern human
02 May 2012


Ancient migration: Coming to America
02 May 2012


Young Americans
02 May 2012


Human evolution: Cultural roots
15 February 2012


African cave’s ancient ochre lab
13 October 2011


Early human migration written in stone tools
27 January 2011





Source: Special issue: Peopling the planet : Nature News & Comment Nature 485, 23 ( 2012)

Not long ago, the story was simple. A vanguard of modern humans left their African birthplace 50,000–60,000 years ago and quickly conquered Asia. They turned left into Europe some 40,000 years ago, later crossing the Bering Strait and marching southward into the Americas. With their advance, Neanderthals and other earlier peoples dwindled and vanished.” …

The most dramatic change, however, concerns the archaic peoples whose world we inherited. In the past two years, ancient-DNA researchers have deciphered the full genome sequences of Neanderthals and a hitherto unknown group called Denisovans, then compared them with modern human genomes. The startling upshot: genetic traces of our vanished cousins live on in people today (see page 33). Just where and how the ancient trysts took place is yet to be revealed, as researchers continue to unravel the human story.”

Source: Special issue: Peopling the planet : Nature News & Comment Nature 485, 23 ( 2012)

— 1 year ago
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